Concerts Luc Houtkamp in Taiwan

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In a few days composer/improviser Luc Houtkamp is arriving from the Netherlands. He is a much respected music personality in The Netherlands with a string of accomplishments. Right now, besides playing/composing, he is best known for his work with the POW Ensemble, which he founded over a decade ago. He is the recipient of the most important Jazz Prize, the Boy Edgar Prize. Very honoured to have him as a guest in our house for a few days! Then he moves on for his Taiwan tour. I will join him two times.

6 March 2015, 12:30 Taishin Bank, Taipei, Luc Houtkamp (sax), Chao-Ming Tung (guzheng), Mark Van Tongeren (voice)

14 March 2015, 19:00 Hsing Tian Kong Library, Taipei, Luc Houtkamp (sax) Chao-Ming Tung, (guzheng) Mark Van Tongeren (voice), Shih-Yang Lee (piano)

Other performances by Luc and Taiwanese musicians:
9 March 2015 Lecture at Shih Chien University, Taipei
11 March 2015 Lecture and Workshop at Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu
11 March 2015 concert in Hsinchu, place and line up tba
12 March 2015, 19:30 Tainan University of the Arts, Tainan, Taiwan with Shih-Yang Lee (piano) Fang-Yi Liu (musical saw & voice)
13 March 2015 Lacking Sound Festival Solo concert.

 

Here is a preview of Luc’s new piece, based on a 1914 novel of Gertrude Stein. Looks very promising!

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Musical pearls from Tuva in Taiwan

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In April two excellent musicians and friends from Tuva are coming to Taiwan, so that people here can get better acquainted with this fascinating musical culture from the North. Get to know Tuvan music and culture and learn throat singing directly from established, original masters!

 

be amazed by Tuva’s signature sounds of throat singing

hear the beats of the shaman drum and Jew’s harp

resonate with the buzzing strings of horse-head fiddles and lute

get blown away by flutes from the steppe

 

Program:

Friday April 9, 19:30          Concert Tuvan throat singing

Wind Records at Huashan Park, Taipei

Saturday April 10, 19:30     Concert Pearls from Siberia

Wistaria Teahouse near Daan Park, Taipei

Sunday April 11,  10-17      1-day workshop throat singing,

Canjune Training Center, Taipei

Monday April 12, 16-18 & 19:30-21:30      2 Lecture-performances

Cheng-Da University, Taipei

The musicians:

 Otkun Dostay

OtkunDostayIgilLiveSmallIn the late 1980s Dostay was the youngest member of the internationally acclaimed Tuva Ensemble. During the late Soviet era he enrolled a theatre school in Leningrad (now Sint-Petersburg), and was engaged in acting, dancing and storytelling. With fellow students Stanislav Iril and Olaak Ondar he took part in Buddhist ceremonies in Leningrad and founded the group Özüm (‘sprouts’). They recorded their first CD in 1991, published by Window to Europe/Orpheus. Dostay has continued to direct Özüm with changing group members over time. He plays horse-head fiddle, all the Tuvan varieties of Jew’s harp and the shaman’s drum. He organised festivals to commemorate the great throat-singer Gennadi Tumat in his native village Khandagayti. He is currently active as the founder-director of the Tuvan-Japanese friendship Center and works as a correspondent for Tuvan State Radio, under the State TV & Radio Company. He regularly performs in solo, duo and ensemble projects, which he toured in Germany, Italy, Norway, The Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Morroco, Japan and China. He has been involved in recording, producing and playing on several CDs of Tuvan music published in Russia, Japan and Europe. In 2013 he published his first solo CD, an exciting mix of traditional songs and melodies with 21st century sounds.

Özüm 1998 CDsmall 

Choduraa Tumat

ChoduraaTumatTreeSmallBorn in Western Tuva, as a girl Tumat was fond of listening to khoomei and sygyt throat singing performed by her brothers. She studied traditional music in music college in Tuva and went on to become one of the world’s most active female overtone/throat singers, as well as the founder and artistic leader of the all-female throat-singing folk ensemble Tyva Kyzy (‘Daughters of Tuva’, www.tyvakyzy.com). She is an accomplished performer of all basic throat-singing styles, sings traditional folk songs, and plays various Tuvan string instruments, Jew’s harps and zither. As a performer, she received many titles in Tuva. She is a teacher of traditional music and khöömei throat-singing at the Pedagogical College of Tuvan State University in Tuva’s capitol Kyzyl. With Tyva Kyzy and with solo projects she toured extensivly in the USA, Poland, Russia, Spain, Portugal, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Japan. She recorded and released several CDs and DVDs, among which her outstanding solo CD Belek/ The Gift.

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 We are still finalising some details, like how and where to get tickets, which we will upload as soon as possible. Please check back soon!

Or get on the email list for early notifications. Email to: info at fusica dot nl.

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Make-a-noise-class for parents and kids (7+)

NTSEC flyer

Sunday February 22 and Sunday March 1, 2015 I will lead a dazzling interactive workshop about sound, listening and the body. With lots of hands-on exercises for parents and kids to make and feel sound, electronic sound gadgets and spectacular visualizations of sound. If you have kids aged 7 and over and look for some holiday fun, join us during one of the four sessions. If you don’t have kids, it is still very worthwile for adults to come and check out the Biorhythm exhibition which was adapted from the one at the Science Gallery in Dublin, Ireland.

Click on the pic below and from there on the circles for more info on each exhibit.

NTSEC Biorhythm

NTSEC Biorhythm website

I believe you do not have to buy a ticket in advance, but if you wish you can at accupass.

(video showing how sound propagates: “Moleculair vibrations and sounds” by B. Gelis, S Blatrix)

Here is the text from the original exhibition in Dublin:

What makes us dance? Why do we sing the blues? Could there be a formula for the perfect hit?

Over 65,000 people came to experience Science Gallery’s exploration of music and the body.

Music is a central part of the human experience, but what is the natural force that drives us to sing, strum, drum and dance? What is the scientific basis of whistling, humming and toe-tapping?

Cognitive scientist Steven Pinker recently claimed that music is “auditory cheesecake”, designed to tickle parts of our brain designed for more serious purposes like speech and abstract reasoning. Darwin, on the other hand, preferred to think that music and dance evolved as an integral part of human courtship rituals. George Bernard Shaw more racily described dancing as “the vertical expression of a horizontal desire”. Our brains, ears and vocal chords are exquisitely designed for enjoying and creating music.

From an acoustic bed to sonic tables and experiments on your emotional response to pop music, Science Gallery’s Summer exhibition BIORHYTHM will allow you to feel how music moves your body through an interactive bazaar of unique sonic experiences, installations, experiments and performances from musicians, engineers and neuroscientists from around the world.

CURATORIAL TEAM: singer Gavin Friday, composer Linda Buckley, Professor Ben Knapp of SARC at Queen’s University Belfast and Professor Ian Robertson of Trinity College Dublin and Michael John Gorman, Science Gallery.

BIORHYTHM is supported by the Department of Tourism, Culture and Sport, our founding partners Ulster Bank and the Wellcome Trust, the members of Science Circle: Dell, Google, ICON, Paccar, Pfizer and our media partner is the Irish Times. Thank you also to Sennheiser and Roland Ireland for their in-kind support of BIORHYTHM, and we are delighted to be joined by Phantom 105.2FM as our BIORHYTHM broadcast partner. Thank you also to DART/Irish Rail for their ongoing support.

Now online: 2 radioshows about throat singing

Slava Kuchenov at the rock formations of Salbyk, Khakassiya. Photo by Mark van Tongeren

Slava Kuchenov at the rock formations of Salbyk, Khakassiya. Photo: Mark van Tongeren 2005

Two programs have just been broadcast online with great recordings of Tuvan and Khakass throat singers. Both are produced by long-time throat singing afficionados who have traveled to Tuva/Khakassiya and deeply involved themselves with Southern Siberian music culture. A unique chance to hear many recordings you will not easily find, or even never find at all. Never mind the Dutch- and Norwegian-language presenters, most of the program is music.

Quick access: Tuvan throat singers and Siberian epic

Read more about it:

1. THROAT SINGERS THAT PASSED AWAY RECENTLY

One show is by Norwegian Morten Abildsnes, and is devoted to throat singers who have passed away in the last 10 years. An important theme which asks our attention to the tragic and untimely fate of many great Tuvan musicians, and which honours them once more (“post-mortem”).  Don’t wait to listen to his one! Only a few weeks are left before it goes offline.

Morten Abildsnes

Morten Abildsnes

The artists presented are:
Ayas Danzyryn 1976–2005
Timur Kara-sal 1973–2005
Mönggün-ool Dambashtai 1956–2009
Aleksandr Sarzhat-ool 1957–2011
Aldyn-ool Sevek 1962–2011
Kongar-ool Ondar 1962–2013
Vladimir Oidupaa 1949–2013
Oktyabr Saaya 1968–2012

The internet-streaming can be heard here
http://radionova.no/programmer/sortkanal
To listen to the program find the black-and-grey player box with the title “Repriser” on the same page, and click the line with the text “Sort Kanal 02.02.2015″. On a narrow screen, you might need to scroll further down the page to find the “Repriser” player. On a broad screen, it might lie right under the black-red-black box.
On this page you can find the playlist.

2. EPIC THROAT SINGING FROM KHAKASSIA

The Dutch program is by Russian-Dutch producer, field-recordist, DJ Maxim Chapochnikov from Amsterdam, founder of Window to Europe. He first travelled to South-Siberia in the early 1990s. On one of his trips he met Slava Kuchenov, who had just received a calling from the spirit of khaidzhi, or epic story-tellers/reciters. Without any further experience or help, Kuchenov build himself an instrument and started reciting ancient stories about Khakass heroes. Kuchenov is and was a very clear case of a young man who does not set out to learn epic singing, but who receives a divine gift to tell epic stories. They just appeared to him, without first learning them by heart, like dreams appear to us. Maksim was there to capture this gift on mic right when it happened (of course Kuchenov still recites epics nowadays). Maksim presents a large part of the original recording in his radioshow. After a Dutch introduction you can hear almost one hour of Khakass epic throat singing. To listen, click on the link below, then click on the small loudspeaker to the right of the words “22:00 – 23:00 De Zwervende Microfoon”.Screen shot 2015-02-08 at 13.33.24http://www.concertzender.nl/programmagids/?date=2015-01-31&month=0&detail=76042

 

Maksim Chapochnikov (photo by Mediamatic)

Maksim Chapochnikov (photo by Mediamatic)

Thanks to Maxim and Morten for sharing these recordings from their collections! Enjoy listening!

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Voice Yoga: Afternoon and Evening classes

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We will change the time of the Voice Yoga classes starting from this week (Thursday, January 29, 2015)  from the morning to the afternoon (14-16). After getting many requests we also begin with an evening class (though not every week). We hope more people who were not able to try out Voice Yoga can come over in the evening. The exact times for every week are given in this separate post, which will always be updated to have the latest information:

Post with Voice Yoga Dates 2015

For all other details about Voice Yoga, check this introduction to the practise:

Post About Voice Yoga

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About Voice Yoga

 

 

VoiceYoga3What is Voice Yoga?

Voice Yoga consists of a series of exercises that gives pride of place to the voice as a central, creative force in our lifes. Our existence depends in important ways on our speaking, listening, sounding and singing abilities. The class promotes awareness of the many roles of the voice in our daily lives. It expands our creative vocabulary, without necessarily talking about music, the singing voice or any musical style. The point is not so much to learn any specific new technique: we play with the voice in a lot of different ways and listen with fresh ears to the hidden potential of our voices.

In Voice Yoga, sound, silence and resonance become a mirror for the self. The sounds produced by ourselves,  allows us to ‘see’ ourselves more clearly, to hear what’s living deep inside us. In ever-growing cycles of creating and perceiving we learn about music and sound, about ourselves and about the environment.

Structure of the classes

We usually start with silence, breath and body movements to turn away from our busy mind into the body and to the sensations we actually experience. We let the voice come out of a natural breath flow. We listen to and follow its natural resonances. We do not try to sing in an artful way, but to experience how body-mind-voice are intimately connected, and how voice and resonance can serve as a bridge to overcome the dualistic notion of body <> mind. From then on, all kinds of styles and genres of vocalising and musicking may happen, some structured, some wild, some giving insight in your voice, some therapeutic. Exercises are based on yoga, musical and theatrical techniques, vipassana meditation and our innate love to play like children.

The idea behind Voice Yoga is comparable to yoga and tai-chi: the effect of the exercises is gradual. We believe that only with repeated classes you can really learn to connect the energies of voice & sound with the whole of your body and mind. You slowly become more and more familiar with your voice and its powers; you will begin to hear and feel things you did not hear and feel before. That’s why we suggest you to sign up for four classes a time after your trial class.

The teacher

Voice Yoga is designed and taught by Mark van Tongeren, who brings with him 25 years of experience in working with sound, music and theatre and many different cultures.

9a973-dscf6809253dmark2bphotoIn my Voice Yoga Review of 2014 you can read about some recent experiences:
https://fusica.wordpress.com/2014/12/30/voice-yoga-2014-re-view/

For whom
For those seeking to enrich their voices, let off steam and unlock their hidden creative potential. For singers and those who are afraid to sing. For actors, musicians and other artists and professionals who work with sound. Perhaps more than anyone else, people who want to experience and learn about the therapeutical effects of sound seem to benefit from Voice Yoga. The human voice is a tool that assists human beings to produce a mirror-like reflection of the world around them in their minds. By gaining a deeper understanding and experience of the mechanisms of making sounds, words and music, and of listening, we gradually deepen the connections within ourselves (our body-minds) and with others and the world around us.

Dates and time
please look here for current dates and times (voice yoga dates 2015).

Prices
Every class lasts two hours. The price is 400 NT$ for a single class, and 1500 NT$ for four classes (375 NT$ per class). You do not have to attend four classes in a row; we’ll just tick off your presence four times and then you can sign up again for four times. Students and others with limited financial resources can get a reduced price: just send a message.

How to register
Feel free to join the Voice Yoga class any time. It is best to send a message every time you want to come, then we prepare a place for you. Write to mark at fusica dot nl or send a text-message to 09 10 48 27 49.

Place
Canjune Training Centre, 4th Floor, number 3 , Lane 151, Fuxing South Road, Section 2, (this is about 20 meters from the corner of FuXing South Road, go up the stairs to the hairdresser and take the elevator to 4F; if you’re early the streetdoor may be closed). Nearest MRT: Technology Building (10 min. walk). Telephone training centre: 02 – 27 00 72 91.

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Voice Yoga 2014 Re-view

Westerpark snow

2014 was a great year for the Voice Yoga class. Some old students came back, and many new enthusiastic students joined for a first time, some of them also coming back.

The outline of the formula was the same: start with silence, breath and ‘body-work’ (which is always also mind-work). Then a first  exploration of our unused potential to make sound, with simple, and sometimes primitive, raw sounds and movements. Then a structured part with more warming-up of ‘body-speech-mind’ (to use the Buddhist three-fold scheme of the human being), thevowel triadand the ‘ocean exercise’. Depending on the particular dynamic of the day (and the duration of the preceding parts), I add two or three of a large pool of rotating exercises that let us listen, feel and (re)sound in different ways. In the end, I often sing with the sruti-box, and students lie down on the mats in the Canjune Training Center.

Some of the new students of this year got really hooked on our weekly session, saying they missed it a lot when I was travelling, for example. Every student’s input changes the way things turn out, and the recent sessions have become true adventures of body, mind and sound. One time, right after a particularly powerful session of vocal noises, chants, screams, rhythms, I asked each student what (s)he had just experienced. I had decided not to interrupt the sound-making, and it had lasted longer than ever, about 45 minutes without a break. It was amazing to hear their deeply personal, moving accounts. Every student had gone  through powerful experiences. One re-lived her pain from the past by letting the sounds follow the beating of her foot, which felt like a great relief. Another mainly listened, which worried me a little; but she was extremely grateful to what she heard and was crying at some point. A therapist told us she used her lessons from Voice Yoga to help others relief their pain, by adding sounds to the massage treatment and inviting her client to make sounds too. Another could hardly find the words to describe her feelings, but said she felt completely enveloped by the other voices and also merged them, while singing or just listening. One student’s first response, after we had just stopped our sound-making, was: ‘Ahh, this is better than sex!’

I usually try to limit my own talking and do not ask students to talk about their experience either. So I was amazed to learn about their feelings and impressions, and felt encouraged to develop this path further. I thank all those who have attended the Voice Yoga class in the last two years, whether it is one or ten or twenty times, for their courage, their input, their creativity. This class is so interesting because of you all! And I thank Canjune for the wonderful and inspiring space, which was renovated early 2014.

Want to join? The dates for 2015 you can find here.